Madison Wright December 25, 1907 through November 18,1994

"Billy Daniels Party" Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, Billy Daniels
"Billy Daniels Party" Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, Billy Daniels
"Billy Daniels Party" Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, Billy Daniels
"Billy Daniels Party" Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, Billy Daniels

"Billy Daniels Party" Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, Billy Daniels
"Billy Daniels Party" Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, Billy Daniels

Cab Calloway Cotton Club Poster
Cab Calloway Cotton Club Poster


Cab Calloway and the Cotton Club Orchestra
Cab Calloway was a famous jazz singer and band leader. He was strongly associated with the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York, where he was a regular performer. He led one of America's most popular jazz bands from the 1930's through the 1940's.
Cab Calloway was born December 25, 1907, and died November 18,1994. Calloway made a great impact on society and culture, as during the Great Depression people were looking for entertainment, and looking for something else to focus on to take their minds away from all of their economic burdens. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression in the decade preceding World War II. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations, but in most countries it started in about 1929 and lasted until the late 1930's or early 1940's. This is the time period when Cab really gained recognition, after being taken under the wing of trumpeter Louis Armstrong. Armstrong was instrumental in turning Calloway's middle-class, choir-boy voice into an icon of scat and jazz vocals that would be recognized world-wide. His band became the top act of the jazz era, and introduced such talented people as Dizzy Gillespie and Cozy Cole. In 1931 Calloway recorded his most famous song, "Minnie the Moocher".
Calloway's impact on today's popular music reaches deep. In his own words; "You see this rapping they're doing today, I did that 25, 35, 45, 55 years ago!". Even the animations of his dance moves done for BettyBoop cartoons in the 1930's show him doing the moonwalk some 50 years before Michael Jackson would make it popular. He was among the first African-American celebrities, breaking new barriers and paving the way for nearly every black performer to come. In the history of pre-war jazz, he remains an important expression of urban culture, upward aspiration, and most of all humor, which no other black artist had dared to leverage with such wide acceptance and popularity.